Hitch Your Wagon to This Deal

This week, Mrs. Bobbins wants you to go west, young quilter.

bobbins bargains logo - 200 wideShe is always one to find a good deal out there in the quilt world.  Now she brings her amazing talents to you … with her weekly Bobbins’ Bargains!

Every Thursday, Mrs. Bobbins will select one of our books and offer it to you at a very special price … 75% off the current listed price!

Better yet, your shipping is FREE in the continental U.S.

Better, better yet, “Five Gets You a Freebie!” If you order a Bobbins’ Bargain just five times, you get a free copy of any of our books! Take your pick. We’ll contact you by email once you’ve qualified for a free book and take your order.  Plus your shipping on that one is free as well. Easy as pie!

This week’s Bobbins’ Bargain is Across the Wide Missouri: A Quilt Reflecting Life on the Frontier, by Edie McGinnis and Jan Patek.

Twelve stories honor the courageous women who left their mothers and fathers, sisters and brothers behind to go west. Their stories are sometimes tragic and sometimes funny. Even though they never knew one another, they had one thing in common: uncommon courage.Across the Wide Missouri cover

The featured quilt – The Kansas City Star’s 2010 Block-of-the-Month project – is offered in two colorways, Jan’s version and Edie’s version.

As you delve into the book, you’ll find quick and easy projects honoring the pioneer spirit. The church was the community gathering place for families on the frontier, and Jan reminds us of that with her Church Bells in the Snow wall hanging. The nine-block Gone Fishing quilt reflects the importance of nature’s offerings for the hardy pioneers who made their way west.

Whether you make the featured quilt, your favorite block or one of the projects, you will be reminded of the incredible pioneer spirit and bravery shown by the intrepid women who stepped into the unknown and made history.

Go to this link — http://youtu.be/OG0ux0uW0AQ  — to see a YouTube video about this book.

The book is on sale for $19.95. Your price using our Bobbins’ Bargains promotion code is just $4.99, plus your shipping on this book is free in the continental U.S.!

Be sure to use this promotion code before checkout:

BOBBINS75

Please make sure to click the “Apply Promotion Code Now” button after entering the code. The discount won’t apply unless you do so. Please verify that you’ve received the discount before checking out.

Click here to order.  And remember … your shipping of this book is free in the continental U.S.!

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Let’s Lighten Up

By Donna di Natale

Donna di Natale

Donna di Natale

It’s spring – at least according to the calendar. Time for spring cleaning and changing that warm winter quilt to a light summer coverlet.

Vintage coverlets are a special interest of mine. When I first saw them, I thought they were simply quilt tops that had never been finished. But after doing a bit of research, and more searching for vintage coverlets in antique shops, I discovered that this really wasn’t the case.

Big, thick quilts are perfect for cold winters. When the cold wind blows, it is so comforting to snuggle under one. But when warmer weather arrives, something lighter is needed to both cover the bed and cover the inhabitants of the bed. Thus, the summer coverlet, which is a quilt without batting or filler.

Some coverlets were foundation pieced on fabric, and then bound or hemmed. These still seem unfinished to me, but I completely understand it when you think about the fact that there are already two layers of fabric.

Nursery Coverlet

The most common summer coverlet is a single layer. This crib coverlet is embroidered. A tasseled edging was added to finish the edges. Embroidery is a common feature of summer coverlets, as is appliqué. This coverlet shows nursery rhyme characters. The boy and girl are assumed to be Jack and Jill, who have fallen down the hill, from the houses at the top of the quilt. What the Pied Piper is doing here is a puzzle for someone else to figure out.

Jack

Pied Piper

Another way of making a coverlet was to layer a top and backing. Not really a quilt, if you consider a quilt to be three layers, but some still call these summer quilts. Many summer quilts were pillowcased, as was the blue baby quilt shown here. The maker turned the quilt right side out, tied it and then sewed Xs all the way around the outer edge to finish it. This sweet quilt is made with simple embroidered squares alternating with solid blocks and shows an interesting use of fabric in the border.

Blue & White summer quilt

The quilt was either made by Margaret Rae Kalin or for her. Her name is stitched in a diamond on the backing.

Margaret Rae

The third example shows the combination of appliqué and embroidery. I love this little duck and her ducklings and have named this my Jemima Puddle Duck coverlet. It is one layer with a handkerchief hem around the edges. It was evidently made for a child’s four-poster bed, because of the cutouts at the bottom.

Puddle DuckCutOutCorners
The ducks and flowers are appliqué edged with embroidery. This was found along with a crib sheet, which has small embroidered animals. I wonder whether they were a set.

Next week, we’ll look at a full-size coverlet for a large bed. In the meantime, tell me about your summer covers and share this with a friend.

Donna di Natale is an author and editor for Kansas City Star Quilts. She writes every Wednesday.

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Mrs. Bobbins

 

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For more quilty laughter from Mrs. Bobbins, get The Big Book of Bobbins by clicking here! Just $16.95! This book is a Bobbins’ Bargain!  Use the promotion code BOBBINS75 at checkout to get 75% off the price of this book through Wednesday,  April 9, 2014. 

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Making My Marker

By Edie McGinnis

Edie McGinnis

Edie McGinnis

A friend sent me a posting for an estate sale the other day. I gave it the once over and, knowing I had a meeting that morning, shrugged it off. Then I took another look and saw that it opened at 2 p.m. Hmmm, maybe I could get there before everything was gone.

Five antique quilts were listed, as well as a spool cabinet. A spool cabinet! I have looked for one of those for years. I’ve found plenty, but they’ve either been battered beyond belief or they were so pricy that I couldn’t afford them. Maybe I would get lucky this time.

I drove to the address posted, found a parking place and walked up to the house. There in the driveway was a trail of what appeared to be litter. Reusable shopping bags, empty cigarette packets, an empty plastic cassette box and a handwritten note held in place with a rock were just a few of the things lined up in the drive.

I passed the trail of debris to chat with the few people in the front of the line. I asked if everyone was to enter the sale through the garage. “Yes,” was the reply, and they said they were the first in line. Anyone else showing up had to get in line behind the “markers.”

Markers? They pointed out the trail of litter and told me that people had left an item to mark their place in line. Who knew there were rules about standing in line for an estate sale? Certainly not me.

I went to the end of the litter trail and took my place in line. I also added a packet of business cards to the trail in case I decided to take a seat on the retaining wall instead of standing for the next hour.

People kept arriving, and soon I had a lot of company behind all the markers. There is not much to do while standing in line other than start chatting with people you have never met and may never meet again.

The two men behind me had driven to the sale from Sedalia, Mo., about 100 miles from Kansas City. They were shopping for the Fiestaware that had been listed. They weren’t even there because they wanted it but were shopping for a friend who couldn’t make it. Or so they said.

They must have attended a lot of estate sales because they seemed to know many of the people standing in line.

“Oh, yeah, you see that guy up there?” one asked. “He’s an antique dealer. All those people in front are dealers.”

Now that was a discouraging thought. I was standing in line behind a bunch of dealers and thinking I might as well go home. The chances of getting that spool cabinet were looking pretty slim.

About five minutes before the doors opened, people swarmed into line after picking up their markers. It was kind of weird to see who picked up what piece of trash and stuck it in their pockets. You could tell who had dropped the cigarette boxes. He was coughing as he bent down to pick them up.

As I walked in the door, the first thing I saw was a man carrying all the antique quilts. My heart sunk, but at least he wasn’t carrying the spool cabinet.

I walked through the house looking for the cabinet. After going through about five rooms, I walked back into the crowded living room and asked one of the people working the sale where I could find the spool cabinet. A voice behind me said, “Spool cabinet? Are you looking for the spool cabinet? It’s right here.”

I turned around, walked five steps and claimed it.cabinet

It wasn’t until I got it home that I took a good look at it. It is a Clark cabinet. Clark is a name we usually see with Coats, as in Coats & Clark thread. Coats bought Clark in 1896. They were run independently until 1931, when the companies named a president, John B. Clark, to run both companies. In 1952, the companies merged, forming Coats & Clark Inc.

In 1877, the J&P Coats Co. came up with a brilliant marketing plan to utilize the wood byproducts in its spool factories. It built a factory in Pawtucket, R.I., to make thread cabinets that could be placed on the counter in general stores. It didn’t take long before other thread companies followed suit.

The cabinets were free to the storekeeper as long as he placed a large initial order for thread. The Clark cabinets usually had a decal that advertised a thread George A. Clark invented called O.N.T., or Our New Thread. O.N.T. was a softly finished thread that worked perfectly in a sewing machine.O.N.T.

Spool or thread cabinets are highly collectible and can be found in a wide array of styles. Some have a gently sloped top that could be used as a writing desk. Some are circular with glass doors. J. P. Coats even produced one that looked like a large spool of thread that rested on its side on a stand and had drawers coming from what would be the top or bottom of the spool.

I’m very excited to have a spool cabinet at long last. Now I can have all my thread stored in one place and an appropriately labeled drawer for each kind.thread in drawer

This has got to be a better storage solution than tucking my thread into a bag here or stuffing it on a shelf there. Gosh, if I’m not careful, I might get organized.

Edie McGinnis is an author and editor for Kansas City Star Quilts. She writes every Friday.

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A REAL Bobbins’ Bargain

Mrs. Bobbins has a special bargain this week, one near and dear to her heart.

bobbins bargains logo - 200 wideShe is always one to find a good deal out there in the quilt world.  Now she brings her amazing talents to you … with her weekly Bobbins’ Bargains!

Every Thursday, Mrs. Bobbins will select one of our books and offer it to you at a very special price … 75% off the current listed price!

Better yet, your shipping is FREE in the continental U.S.

Better, better yet, “Five Gets You a Freebie!” If you order a Bobbins’ Bargain just five times, you get a free copy of any of our books! Take your pick. We’ll contact you by email once you’ve qualified for a free book and take your order.  Plus your shipping on that one is free as well. Easy as pie!

This week’s Bobbins’ Bargain is The Big Book of Bobbins: Fun, Quilty Cartoons, by Julia Icenogle.

Since Mrs. Bobbins’ inception on June 25, 2008, many quilters have become die-hard fans. If you enjoy the weekly Bobbins cartoons on the Kansas City Star Quilts site, this book is for you. It’s 112 pages of Mrs. Bobbins’ fun, silly, quilty antics!

The Big Book of Bobbins is divided into 10 chapters – everything from quilting humor to quilting frustrations. You’ll see Mrs. Bobbins use her rotary cutter on a pizza and accidentally sew her quilt to the tablecloth. You’ll also get a glimpse of Mr. Bobbins’ naivety when it comes to his wife’s hobby, then curiosity overwhelming him as he takes a stab at quilting himself! Enjoy the holidays at the Bobbins’ – always a quilty treat – and meet Mrs. Bobbins’ friends and beloved cats. Top all that off with current events and a road trip to a quilt show, and you have The Big Book of Bobbins!

But we must warn you: As you laugh through the pages, you may notice that Mrs. Bobbins reminds you of someone – YOU!big book of bobbins

The book is on sale for $16.95. Your price using our Bobbins’ Bargains promotion code is just $4.24, plus your shipping on this book is free in the continental U.S.!

Be sure to use this promotion code before checkout:

BOBBINS75

Please make sure to click the “Apply Promotion Code Now” button after entering the code. The discount won’t apply unless you do so. Please verify that you’ve received the discount before checking out.

Click here to order.  And remember … your shipping of this book is free in the continental U.S.!

Leave a Comment

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